Mystery of the third temple

One of today’s modern prophecies is the rebuilding of the third temple. A little history though, the first temple was built around 1000-2000 years before Christ (or the Common Era). The temple was rebuilt within a few centuries before the coming of the Christ in the first century. Each of the three main Abrahamic religions believes in a future kingdom with a temple rebuilt for the third time. They use the book of Ezekiel which talks about the rebuilding of a future temple. Maybe we need to stop reading the Bible with contemporary lenses, since this book was written around the time of the Babylonian exile, before the second temple was rebuilt.

The abomination of desolation mentioned in the book of Daniel was about the rebuilding of the second temple. Jesus’s reference to the abomination of desolation was to the destruction of the same temple which took place in AD 70. It didn’t take much research to show that there was a seven year war between the Romans and the Jews, in which the temple was destroyed at the midpoint. It looks like people who are still waiting for the rapture today have the right events, but they haven’t realized it’s all ancient history now.

The Dome of the Rock is practically onsite of Solomon’s temple today. This was built by the Muslims in the 6th or 7th century. It’s not likely they are going to tear this down in the future since it has been standing for so long. People that are still looking for the temple to be rebuilt don’t know this interesting tidbit because they don’t study the history of geographic locations.

Jesus said “destroy this temple and I will rebuild it within three days.” The Christ’s temple is His Body, otherwise known as the Church (not divided by walls and borders). The Lord already reigns through His people. It is a spiritual reign. Waiting for Jesus to return and set up His Kingdom on earth is waiting for a political kingdom. It is the same mistake that Jesus’s first century followers made as well.

So if Jesus established the third temple in the first century, where does that leave salvation today? Some people who reject Preterism say this means our salvation is in the past. Time is man-made so there is no past, present, or future. It is all one time. Salvation is an ongoing journey that flows out of one’s relationship with their Creator.