Minimalism: Making room for more

Now that I have simplified my life over the last six years, I am discovering that part of the secret to making money is solving complex problems. Man has a tendency to complicate things and this is actually where the money is at. The simple life may be the good life but it is not where the money is.


Being a minimalist is good. To a point, that is. But becoming a minimalist is not about the lack of ambition that many people think it is. Even the folks over at The Minimalist website (the Beckers in Arizona) consider themselves a middle class family.
Minimalism is all about prioritizing what you want in life and making balance.

It is all about knowing yourself and what you truly want out of life. Essentially you minimize the clutter and maximize your potential elsewhere.

As someone on my social media feed said, the best way to find your calling in life is to ask yourself what problem you would like to solve.


The best way to market yourself is to make the problem sound as complicated as possible and then in the interview you go and make yourself sound like you are the only one who is able to solve said problem.

Play the game. Or white man’s game, or whatever you call it. Although it is not really just the white man’s game anymore.


My ability to simplify as a freelance writer resulted in getting paid less for jobs. When you get paid by the word, it is not a good idea to simplify content into less words. I read somewhere that even in novels, the authors have to insert fluff. The result is a 500 page novel may in all actuality just be a 100+ page short story.


Factor in that every time the author mentions a name brand product that the advertiser pays a bonus to the publisher and then subsequently to the author.


So basically, the secret to making money is to overthink and overcomplicate. Then proceed to solve the problem by creating another problem. Or maybe two or three more. Why not be an overachiever?
Keep doing this for four or five decades until you can retire.

My new theme

I have been blogging for nearly 10 years. Although I haven’t done as much blogging the last five. I keep saying that I am reorganizing myself. I accidentally deleted half of my original posts so now I have nothing to show for any of it.

I spent the last few years rewriting as many missing posts as I could. Now I am just now getting back on track. So far blogging is just a hobby. I still feel as if it is my spiritual calling. This just means that even if I don’t make money at it, it can still serve a higher purpose and make a difference in people’s lives.

Maybe that is the often overlooked truth in life. In a money-centric society we feel as if we aren’t accomplishing as much if we aren’t accumulating capital. In reality we are making a difference in our service to others and rich in other ways that cannot be measured in dollars.

I always look forward to your comments. Till my next post I have to go find other ways to “unleash the beast”. For some reason that sounds perverted no matter how I say it.

Never underestimate the impact of less

The shortest verse in the Bible is the one that read “Jesus wept.” This verse reveals more about Jesus than any other in the New Testament. The verse also reveals a side of Jesus that isn’t acceptable in men today; his human side. It was this same side that chose to hang out with the marginalized people in society.

You know, the side that drank wine and hung out with prostitutes and even gay people (called eunuchs in the Bible). It’s amazing how Jesus can hang out with prostitutes and drink wine, though when I do it I get called a heathen.

Either way, the point of this blog post was not to underestimate the power of less. Less is more in some cases. A short read can be just as full of impact as a long one; often more so because the longer one is mostly fluff to make it longer.