The Double Standard of buying water

Back when I was the assistant department manager in a grocery store, I see a lot of water flying off the shelves. This is especially true during the summer months. I even hear customers talk about how a certain type or brand of water is the best thing that they have ever had.  

All this variety and very little difference

I don’t know about anybody else but I have sampled a lot of the water that my store sells. Of course I have limits as to how much I will pay for water; for example $3-5 dollars for a gallon of water when most gallons are in the $1-2 range. Although I have snagged the more expensive ones when they were on sale.  

I have to admit that I cannot taste a difference in all the water. But each person is entitled to their opinions. If they didn’t have their opinions, I might lose money in the water department and be out of a job.  

Paying for water twice. When it is free already

Speaking of water department, it seems like a double standard to buy water when we already pay for it in the water bill. Even if you don’t pay the actual bill, it is included in the rent. Unless you don’t pay rent that is.  

I could just as easily buy a pitcher and keep the water cold but every time that I try this, it always mysteriously turns into sweet tea. Plus it is convenient to just buy a gallon of water for $1-2 every few days. Aside from the convenience of bottled water, I can’t help but point out the irony that one of the leading brands of water is “Evian”. I don’t have to tell you what that spells backwards.  

So basically, it’s sort of like double taxation paying for water twice. But somehow I feel I may have a moral obligation to actually buy the water in the store now. After all, I wouldn’t want to kill capitalism and the jobs that it creates.   

Lies from the tablecloth

brown wooden blocks on white surface
Photo by Brett Jordan on Pexels.com

The following blog post is about some of the biggest lies we hear in the world. It’s not that the people that tell us these lies are intentionally lying to us; they are sincerely trying to believe the lie themselves. These lies are stuff that we really want to be true but human nature proves otherwise. Not only will I tell you what the lies are, I will also give ideas on how to make it more truthful in your life.

  1. The biggest lie we have heard all of our lives is that size doesn’t matter. Women that say this just don’t want to sound like sluts or make a guy feel bad for not being well-endowed. Although there are other ways to be well-endowed but that is another blog post entirely. You can tell by the jokes about size that it does matter, or they wouldn’t talk about it so much. If you are small, you just have to hope to have something else going for you to help you overcompensate. For example, find someone that is looking for authentic emotional connection over everything else.
  2. The second lie we tell ourselves, or hear others say, is that money isn’t everything. This never makes sense when you have bills to pay. When doing business, money is pretty much everything. Although we probably should value people over money, but that might make us more of a socialist than a capitalist.
  3. While this list is an exhaustive one, I just picked the top three biggest whoppers. The last biggest one on this list is the lie that there is someone for everybody. Meeting someone special is chance a lt of the time. You do have to put yourself out there. But nothing is guaranteed. Life circumstances may cause you to be alone. Better to be alone than to rush into a relationship with the wrong person. Wayne Dyer once said you can never be alone if you like who you are with.

There is the top three biggest lies we heard all of our lives in this world. The list can go on and on but I just picked the most popular ones from off the top of my head. The title is from a System of a Down song, so it was totally random.

Life is about exchange

You’re probably thinking life is all about money.

It would seem as if life is all about money.

Money has a way of becoming the end goal, when you have bills to pay.

The government makes things about money the way they keep inflating the currency.

Life is not about money.

It is about exchange.

Money or not, we live on exchange.

It’s possible to be 100% self-sufficient, but it’s not desirable.

Money is just a convenience, compared to actual bartering.

Money isn’t the end goal, what we are trying to pay for is. Our desired lifestyle.

The service to other people is it’s own compensation. This is what we will get paid in heaven. That’s why lower paying jobs don’t pay much, because they pay more intrinsically. Although the intrinsic reward doesn’t always pay the bills, unless you have very low living standards; which isn’t necessarily a bad thing.

Life isn’t about money. It’s about exchange. The basis for economy is how to meet our needs and what we have to exchange for it. Money is just more convenient.

Focus on what you want out of life, and you will attract the means to “pay” for it.

Acting as if. . .

Have you ever heard that phrase “fake it till you make it?” You might be living under a rock if you haven’t. Personally, I hate this phrase. I don’t like anything that makes me feel fake. However, acting as if is a genuine concept. That is what this blog post is all about, how to “act as if” you already have what you want in life.

Along with the concept of acting as if comes the realization that prosperity is a mindset. This means that the poor are already rich, they just don’t know it yet. Maybe because they let the mainstream media tell them how poor they are. Or because they keep comparing themselves to those that have more, or at least have to those that appear to have more because their standards are higher.

I once saw a quote in the Talmud that said a man is rich who is content with his lot. The Bible says in the Book of Ecclesiastes to accept one’s lot in life. That doesn’t mean we shouldn’t strive to be better or change our situation if we don’t like where we are at. It just means that nothing is promised so change isn’t always guaranteed. Or we could die before anything actually changes, since nothing is promised to us in this life.

There is another saying that if you change the way you look at things, things tend to change. By adopting a prosperity mindset, we attract a better outcome and repel anything negative in our lives. Income wise, we may still look poor by the world’s standards, but we will attract all the things that money can’t buy. Namely better relationships who value actual relationships over material gain. If we live in a bad neighborhood, we may move to a cheaper neighborhood in a lower cost of living area. Or a lower income community where the people are not so bad. I’m not trying to discourage anyone from making more money, just saying it’s not the end all and be all of life that we sometimes make it out to be.

By “acting as if” or adopting a prosperity mindset, we can be more mindful and enjoy life in the present since it’s all that we have. For example, I haven’t made it as a published writer yet, but I can still act like I have my own column since I have this blog and social media followers. In a sense, I already am a published writer even if I’m not making any money at it yet. Or at least much. I may still be making a difference in the world, hopefully with the few people who I do reach. Either that or they will just think I am retarded and feel sorry for me.

The fallacy of planning for tomorrow (or anytime in the future)

James 4:13-15. . .”And now I have a word for you who brashly announce, ‘Today, at the very latest tomorrow, we are off to such and such a city for a year. We are going to start a business and make a lot of money.’ You don’t know the first thing about tomorrow. You are nothing but a wisp of fog, catching but a brief bit of sun before disappearing. Instead make it a habit of saying, ‘if the Master wills and we are still alive, we will do this or do that.'” (The Message)

Today’s devotional sounds like most people nowadays. This just proves that people don’t really change. We are always planning for our future. In and of itself this is not a bad thing; we just have to remember that nothing is promised. This flies in the face of the prosperity gospel which claims God has much wealth in store for us. There is truth to the prosperity gospel but it is more internal; i.e., from the inside out.

This does not mean we shouldn’t be ambitious. Ambition is a good thing because it is better than living an idle life. Worldly ambition leads us to pray to God with wrong motives which serve to only benefit ourselves only. True ambition involves living humbly before God and walking in the Spirit. Maybe it would help us to look at all the other blessings that our business brings us rather than just the monetary ones.

Follow your dreams but be realistic. Put God first and remember nothing in the future is set in stone. It is a fallacy to believe we have our whole lives ahead of us because every day is a gift with no promise of another day. Although our spirits will live on in another realm.