Acting as if. . .

Have you ever heard that phrase “fake it till you make it?” You might be living under a rock if you haven’t. Personally, I hate this phrase. I don’t like anything that makes me feel fake. However, acting as if is a genuine concept. That is what this blog post is all about, how to “act as if” you already have what you want in life.

Along with the concept of acting as if comes the realization that prosperity is a mindset. This means that the poor are already rich, they just don’t know it yet. Maybe because they let the mainstream media tell them how poor they are. Or because they keep comparing themselves to those that have more, or at least have to those that appear to have more because their standards are higher.

I once saw a quote in the Talmud that said a man is rich who is content with his lot. The Bible says in the Book of Ecclesiastes to accept one’s lot in life. That doesn’t mean we shouldn’t strive to be better or change our situation if we don’t like where we are at. It just means that nothing is promised so change isn’t always guaranteed. Or we could die before anything actually changes, since nothing is promised to us in this life.

There is another saying that if you change the way you look at things, things tend to change. By adopting a prosperity mindset, we attract a better outcome and repel anything negative in our lives. Income wise, we may still look poor by the world’s standards, but we will attract all the things that money can’t buy. Namely better relationships who value actual relationships over material gain. If we live in a bad neighborhood, we may move to a cheaper neighborhood in a lower cost of living area. Or a lower income community where the people are not so bad. I’m not trying to discourage anyone from making more money, just saying it’s not the end all and be all of life that we sometimes make it out to be.

By “acting as if” or adopting a prosperity mindset, we can be more mindful and enjoy life in the present since it’s all that we have. For example, I haven’t made it as a published writer yet, but I can still act like I have my own column since I have this blog and social media followers. In a sense, I already am a published writer even if I’m not making any money at it yet. Or at least much. I may still be making a difference in the world, hopefully with the few people who I do reach. Either that or they will just think I am retarded and feel sorry for me.

What makes someone a capitalist?

What comes to mind when you think of capitalism? The first answer most people will give is money. That is, except for those that understand the purpose of money and that the currency is largely made up to facilitate trade and value assets.

This blog post will entertain the idea that anyone, or most people, can be a capitalist. Many will claim to be anti-capitalist because they are not interested in “playing the game”, or they are content with their life and not into raising their standard of living.

Let’s start with the definition of capitalism:

Capitalism is defined as a system made up of private owners who control a nation’s industry and trade for profit, as opposed to being controlled by the state. At one time these private owners were mostly small businesses. Throughout the end of the 19th century and the 20th century, the private ownership has tilted more toward corporations.

Is capitalism all about money?

Technically capitalism isn’t just about money, since currency is a social construct. The definition says it is about profit though. Money is a tool or a resource that is used to make said profit. The profit is made by being of service to others. However, it trends toward favoritism because a capitalist is only serving people who can pay for the created product.

Money may not have necessarily been the end goal during the early stages of capitalism. As standards of living rose, so did the cost of living. In the 21st century, we are moving into supercapitalism, or hyper-capitalism. This is where few of us will experience the highest standard of living known to man. The pitfall is money becomes more of an end goal with most successful capitalists giving in to the “money is everything” mentality; most religious people would see this as idolatry.

Is capitalism a biblical system?

The kingdom of God is bigger than money, no doubt. The underpinnings, or ideas, behind any man-made system may come from the Divine; though humans are flawed and can corrupt anything.

More about this topic in a recent blog post with the same title:

Is capitalism a biblical system? | Daily Evotionals & E’isms

The most interesting answer to who can be a capitalist came in some recent article that I read recently. It said basically that anyone who believes in the free market is a capitalist, while anyone who believes the government needs to have more authority over our lives is a socialist. According to that definition, you can be an exploited worker and still be a capitalist. Especially since all socialism seems to offer exploited workers is dependency on government welfare programs. Even most people who profess to be anti-capitalists would choose capitalism over any form of communism any day of the week.

Since there has always been a system of free enterprise as long as there has been money, I wouldn’t worry about all the fear mongering surrounding the possibility of collapse. Especially when you understand that the market is rigged not to collapse anyway. Businesses do adapt though. Like everything else, economies hit their peak and then they go backward. The benefit of moving backward is everything that went out of style may become popular again.

We may be in late-stage capitalism but if it did crash it would just start over again. Remember no matter what system you live under, including a traditional economy which is what most third world (or developing countries have) it is God who brings true prosperity. When we give credit to a system, that shows we are making an idol out of the system.

Is it more moral to be a Republican or a Democrat?

photo of cloudy skies over american flag
Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

The title to this blog post has been an ongoing question over the last decade. While it seems most religious people tend to lean toward the right of the spectrum, a growing number of voters are voting left. They cite that it is moral to help the poor and disenfranchised. They are right in that it is, it just depends on who is more moral in doing it.

I grew up in a conservative state and visited the west coast enough to see how democratic states function. I did not see much of a difference with regards to social services. The main difference was that social service organizations relied more on actual donations rather than government welfare programs. I also noticed that organizations like Salvation Army had dorms where they rented out a bed and a locker to transient people more in conservative states.

It should be noted that Democracy is a secular idea that originated in ancient Greece and thrived mostly in pagan societies. Maybe this is why democratic societies embrace science more than religion and trend towards atheism. The one thing I noticed in democratic societies is a higher cost of living and a tax on virtually everything. This goes against the notion of a free society that was envisioned by our founding fathers during the Enlightenment. Maybe this is why the founders did not speak very well of Democracy.

The spread of democracy tends to lead toward more government dependency (i.e., social poverty) and runs antithesis to capitalism. More atheists lose faith in the church and subsequently the free market and this explains why they lean more towards democracy and big government. From growing up in a conservative society, the market always tends to provide for the needs of everyone. Most counties in Texas have county hospitals for those that lack health insurance, for example.

From the divine perspective, I don’t think it really matters who is you vote for. It is God who prospers His people. Prosperity in the kingdom of God may not look like prosperity from the world’s point of view since the Kingdom is not dependent on money like the world is. A wise person that can live simple is just as prosperous as a billionaire. The spiritual realm is the only realm where all things are truly equal.

On a final note, when a Democrat gets elected, it is usually during a recession. Therefore, if the economy looks like it is doing better under democrats, it is more than likely because the economy is already in the process of bouncing back. Also, there is the fact that governments spend more money which makes the economy looks like it is thriving; all the while putting society in a debt that will probably never be able to pay back.

The biblical meaning of “middle class”

Proverbs 30:8. . .”Keep falsehood and lies far from me. Give me neither poverty nor riches; give me only my daily bread.”

This verse if pretty much the biblical basis for being “middle class”; one who is neither rich nor poor. When we look around and see someone with much wealth, our natural assumption is that these people are rich. Ironically, people who make six to seven figures per year don’t often see themselves as wealthy. This is funny considering they have more than 90% of the population, and more than that in a global sense.

Does the Bible encourage building wealth?

The Bible doesn’t encourage us to strive for wealth. Even the New Testament says to keep our lives free from the love of money. People in the Old Testament were wealthy but mostly in the sense of owning land that was given to them after years of working it, or through inheritance. Jesus and his apostles were at or near poverty. Many mystics in the early church through the last few centuries were known for taking a vow of poverty and living a life of simplicity.

If you believe in divine providence, then poverty is a mindset. Those that tithed in the Old Testament gave a voluntary tithe in response to already being blessed by God. God’s blessings are based on who He is and not dependent on anything we do. We are already blessed. Material blessings are separate from divine blessings, though the latter can overflow into the former.

Prosperity is a mindset: Real wealth is gathered little by little

Since God doesn’t condemn anyone, no one is condemned for pursuing wealth; though God will hold one to a higher standard if they pursue wealth. They will have to use it to serve others to some capacity.

Studies show capitalism has lifted 40% of people out of poverty. That means 60% still live in poverty; with most of these people living in third world, or developing countries. Many people are poor because they live in communities. We in the United States still have Amish and Quakers who still live this way.

Middle class is an illusion for poor people trying to look rich

The Bible never says anything about the existence of a middle class, no does any religious text. There are only rich and poor, with the former usually getting rich off of exploiting the poor. Find a passive income opportunity where you don’t have to work hard; guess what, just because you aren’t working hard doesn’t mean someone isn’t, and usually for low wages.

If there were no poor people, what would the middle class be? Likewise what would this class be if there were no rich people? I have a feeling middle class is a man-made term for people who don’t want to label themselves as poor.

The Kingdom of God is the inverse of the world

In the Kingdom of God, the poor are the rich because they, in most cases,trust more in the Divine and are the least enslaved to the worldly systems. Money is created out of debt, so the more you have the more debt you probably have. It is all superficial.

Put God first, love and serve others, and focus on the opportunities around you to live as richly as possible, regardless of income. Capitalism at its base is more about maximizing the use of one’s resources.

What are we so afraid of?

You ever notice how people always talk about how they are getting old? Some people start doing this as young as 20. The healthiest people and those who live the longest lives all tell us that age is just a number and we are only as old as we feel. So why do we tell ourselves how we are getting old and falling apart?

For one reason, most people don’t understand the power of their own self-talk. The more we tell ourselves how old we feel, the more it will appear that we are falling apart. If we affirm that we are in good health and strive to take care of ourselves, we will actually start to look and feel better.

Part of the fall of man is the descent into the negative mindset. This is very hard to overcome. A growing number of people are aware that they are slaves to negative thinking but they feel powerless to change it. In order for positive affirmations to actually work, you have to actually believe what you are trying to tell yourself.

Maybe at its core, we do not fear getting old. It’s the fear of our inevitable death that haunts us, with each day bringing us closer to our fate.

When we come to the knowledge of God and understand that life is eternal and we will live forever somewhere, that fear of death instantly gets replaced with more positive energy; if we really believe it anyway. Remember the Bible also says that perfect love casts out fear. Faith is the opposite of fear. Since most sicknesses are the result of stress, anxiety and hidden fears, walking by faith is the proverbial cure all that will heal us. Sadly, don’t expect most doctors to tell you that you have the power to heal yourself of pretty much every disease.