The 80/20 Rule: How the world works

Proverbs 22:29. . .”Do you see truly competent workers; they will serve kings rather than ordinary people.” (NLT)

Have you ever heard of the 80/20 rule? In the world of work, it basically says 80% of the work is performed by 20% of the people. From my experience in work, if you are in the top 20% you will know it. The same goes for the way society is structured. Everyone has no doubt heard of the 1%; these are the elitists who own everything, or the Aristocracy/ruling class. They own the corporations and control the money supply. The middle class are the top 20% who earn 80% of all the money and wealth created. This means only 20% of the money is to be fought over by 80% of society. Sounds kind of brutal, doesn’t it?

On a somewhat positive, yet dismal note, this just means that companies could lay-off up to 80% of the workforce and you probably wouldn’t notice much of a difference. Except for the 80% of people who are now unemployed. This can be turned into a positive too most of these people figure out a way to become self-employed. This explains what has been happening since the 1990’s when the United States economy peaked and Corporate America has been declining ever since.

Believe it or not, you can get an idea of how the world works just by reading the Bible. Keep in mind that just because something is biblical doesn’t mean it’s godly; for example, killing people in the name of God or dashing baby’s heads against rocks (every Atheists favorite argument against the God of the Bible).

Today’s devotional says that a man who is skilled in his work will serve the interests of kings and not ordinary people. Although it may be more godly to serve the ordinary (blue collar) people, you won’t make much more than poverty wages in doing so. A man who rises above this stature in life will likely serve the public interest, namely the government or corporations.

Don’t focus on who you’re actually serving, focus more on being yourself and creating something of value and you will attract people who truly value your work. Be the best you can be and you will probably be discovered by some corporation (today’s kings). If you reach a level of spiritual growth where you are truly content serving the common man, then you are already rich by biblical standards. All of your needs will be met in some form or another, even if you don’t get rich by the standards of the world.

Blue collar jobs as career options?

I grew up in a blue collar working class family. Actually back in the 1970’s this was the middle class. Since the 1980’s the middle class has evolved to include mostly corporate jobs with the working class falling behind; even though they are the backbone of society and are the ones who create the wealth in society that the upper classes live off of.  

It kind of reminds me of a line from the movie Good Will Hunting where Matt Damon was telling his counselor Sean, played by the late Robin Williams, that there was honor in doing construction work. While many people will look down on someone who waits tables or works as a retail clerk in a store or a gas station, it is good to note that there is no such things as a dead end job.  

The Bible even says that there is profit in all labor. Although it seems as if the better paying jobs involve dealing with more bullshit; not to mention the lower paying jobs tend to be funner and less monotonous.  

Just because I returned to my first job in my fourth company at 40 years of age doesn’t mean I will stay there forever. Even if I stay with the same company, I will likely end up as a store manager or at corporate.  I even talk to the bread vendors who deliver to the store; this is the highest paying outside vendor that we deal with and they are the only vendors who work as independent contractors. Imagine the luxury of smelling fresh bread every morning.  

Also, the last few years I have seen more retail space opening up in shopping centers while corporate jobs decline. The private sector is the backbone of the economy and this is why I feel we have nothing to worry about if the economy were to collapse. It would just go back to the way it was before with smaller family owned businesses. And there would likely be a lot more community.  

I am not ready for it yet but every time I pass by a vacant store for lease, I can almost envision seeing myself owning my own store. I love buying stuff from the local store owners as opposed to corporate chain stores as it feels like I am supporting a greater purpose.  

As much as I miss driving at the auto auction, I have looked into the possibility of acquiring a dealer’s license and flipping used cars.  

It’s not conflicted to have options. As long as you are content where you are at while you dream big.  Of course you can get so content that you end up not doing anything.